S.C. primaries nearing: what students say about politics

By:
Feb 03, 2016
2016 brings a presidential election. During the fall 2015 semester, Claflin was visited by longtime civil rights activist Jesse Jackson and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. A common message was getting involved and becoming voters. Here are some student reactions from both visits regarding candidates, the election and voting. South Carolina’s presidential primaries are Feb. 20 for Republicans and Feb. 27 for Democrats.

This account is compiled from reports by , DARRYL BYNEM JR., CARRIE BYRD, KIERRA CARTER, KEEGAN FRANKLIN, TARRYN DELYONS, DENZEL HODGES, JESSICA HUNTER, TOMMY MATTHEWS, TAMMY WHITE.

Claflin senior Stanley Stewart: “I like Hillary Clinton. She has the best viewpoints among the candidates and she would bring change and jobs to our nation. I will be there to vote and let my voice be heard.”
Aria Dillard, Ms. Claflin University: “Yes I care about the race but Hillary Clinton coming here didn’t win my vote. My opinion, I’m glad that she came to our school and I think that a lot of the things she said sounded great, but I can’t help but wonder if she only stated what she thought we would like to hear.”
Senior Aaron Bradley: “It says a lot to see that a presidential candidate realizes the importance of actually taking time to address a community that is often overlooked. … I care about the race because whoever wins the office will have a huge impact and influence on the development of policy and federal assistance in the United States. As a citizen, I feel that the best way to protect my interests and the welfare of my future is to be actively involved in following the race.”
Senior Brenee Howell: “I feel that Claflin University is a great school, but the setting was too small for a lot of people to attend at one time to hear Hillary.”
Senior Rodricka Gooch: “I enjoyed the meeting style. It gave me a chance to listen to Hillary discuss her ideas at a meeting and for her to listen to what the people have to say and ways to implement her plans and ideas when she get into office. I loved how she took questions from the floor. It gave Hillary a chance to see what the people would like to see.”
Senior Christopher Cathy: “I can care less about the elections. It seems to me that since Obama has been in office, he has been making major changes, but the Republicans don’t care. They just want him out of the office.”
Tray Throne: “I didn’t vote last time and I won’t be voting this time. They (are going to put) whoever they want in office anyway.”
Junior Antwan Greene: “I really do not care for Hillary Clinton that much.”
Aaron Kennedy: "I personally do not like her (Hillary Clinton). She puts on a show in front of people just so they can  vote for her." Bernie Sanders speaks like a true Democrat and he does not go in circles with his speeches like Hillary does. “I have my eye on those two candidates only, because I do not even know why Donald Trump is running. He should've just stayed being a rich businessman."
Reginald Chisolm: Hillary Clinton “wouldn't make a bad president, and it would be nice to have a woman in office, but as far as her political standpoints, I do not stand by them." 
“She has been in the game for years, she upholds a certain point of view, just like the past presidents. In my opinion, I think she would be like another George Bush instead of being herself and only herself as a president."
“I care about the presidential race to an extent; I honestly would want Obama to be president again but that won't happen, but I side with Bernie. His views seem more Democrat then Republican like Hillary's. Also I would definitely not vote for Donald Trump or Ben Carson. Their political views are definitely nonsense."
Ny’Quasia Murray: “Hillary Clinton will make history as the first woman president and is a great leader to look up to. I personally admire the way she didn’t hide behind her husband’s shadow.”
Chase White “I am not that into politics. I just want the next president to be like Obama, because he is cool.”
Junior Makayla Jackson: “Voting is very important especially for our generation because in a way I believe young people are more open minded. The future is in our hands. I haven't been following all of the candidates, just Trump and Clinton, but I do know that it is important that I learn about the other people running. We all choose one person to be in charge of the United States, and we can't take that lightly."
Sophomore Youshi Kirkland: “I think that voting is very important, especially for people that are 18 years old. Some people are legal to vote for the next president but either don't go vote or don't follow what's going on. I am paying attention too what's going on now, but before I just followed what was talked about the most."
Freshman Kimya Jackson: “I plan on getting registered.” As to getting others registered too: “I think every vote counts.”
Freshman Denijah Henderson: “I am not registered but I am going to register.”
Senior Nathen Gamble lll said he is registered to vote and voted in the past election. “Voting is very important. It gives me the opportunity to voice my opinion.”
Sophomore D’Andria Robertson: “I enjoyed the (Jackson) speech and thought it was very informative to the youth and Orangeburg County.” It was “a great learning experience.”
Junior Taylor Shirley: Jackson “motivated many students to vote and was very encouraging to tell the students not to give up on their dreams and aspirations.”
Pashala Truesdale: “I think that I only voted once. Voting isn’t that important to me and I don’t follow the presidential election campaign. I don’t encourage people to vote either, but I will start.”
Jericha White: “It is important to vote because there was a time when African-Americans could not vote at all. I plan to become involved this presidential election so I can encourage my friends to vote.”
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