Tisdale ready to expand
during ‘great time in Claflin history’

Claflin President Henry N. Tisdale addresses Mass Communications Department students during a news conference that focused on plans for the future of the campus.

President addresses
the football question

By ARIELLE HAYES
The Panther

Will football return to Claflin?
It’s a question that President Henry N. Tisdale says he gets often.
President H.V. Manning ended the football program in fall 1964 because Claflin didn’t have enough resources for academic priorities and a football team, Tisdale told multimedia students during an April news conference.
It would take a lot of money for Claflin to bring back the football program, he said. The school would have to buy uniforms, insurance and create scholarship money for the players.
“We would not expect to make money with a football team. It wouldn’t pay for itself, taking funds from other programs,” Tisdale said.
“If someone can show me the money, I’m all for it.”
With or without football, Tisdale said he loves what athletics bring to the university. Five years ago, Claflin joined the NCAA Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference to increase the competitiveness of the athletic department.
“The athletic program is on the rise, it’s great for the university,” Tisdale said. “Come out and support our athletics.”

May 09, 2014

By ARIELLE HAYES
The Panther

Will football return to Claflin?

It’s a question that President Henry N. Tisdale says he gets often.

President H.V. Manning ended the football program in fall 1964 because Claflin didn’t have enough resources for academic priorities and a football team, Tisdale told multimedia students during an April news conference.

It would take a lot of money for Claflin to bring back the football program, he said. The school would have to buy uniforms, insurance and create scholarship money for the players.

“We would not expect to make money with a football team. It wouldn’t pay for itself, taking funds from other programs,” Tisdale said.

“If someone can show me the money, I’m all for it.”

With or without football, Tisdale said he loves what athletics bring to the university. Five years ago, Claflin joined the NCAA Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference to increase the competitiveness of the athletic department.

“The athletic program is on the rise, it’s great for the university,” Tisdale said. “Come out and support our athletics.”

 
May 09, 2014

By ARIELLE HAYES
The Panther

Will football return to Claflin?

It’s a question that President Henry N. Tisdale says he gets often.

President H.V. Manning ended the football program in fall 1964 because Claflin didn’t have enough resources for academic priorities and a football team, Tisdale told multimedia students during an April news conference.

It would take a lot of money for Claflin to bring back the football program, he said. The school would have to buy uniforms, insurance and create scholarship money for the players.

“We would not expect to make money with a football team. It wouldn’t pay for itself, taking funds from other programs,” Tisdale said.

“If someone can show me the money, I’m all for it.”

With or without football, Tisdale said he loves what athletics bring to the university. Five years ago, Claflin joined the NCAA Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference to increase the competitiveness of the athletic department.

“The athletic program is on the rise, it’s great for the university,” Tisdale said. “Come out and support our athletics.”

 

By ANDRES WATERS
The Panther

Dr. Henry N. Tisdale is marking 20 years as Claflin president, focusing on the future and emphasizing a legacy of success upon which he intends for the university to build.
During a news conference with Mass Communications Department students, Tisdale said, “You are here during a great time in Claflin history.”
“I returned to my alma mater with ideas of change,” Tisdale said. “I wanted academic success to be the flagship of the university.”
To achieve that, his first objective was to bring in a world-class faculty and staff. Two decades later, Claflin is acknowledged as an academic and research leader among HBCUs and liberal arts colleges and universities nationwide.
Campus growth and improvement have been priorities. “Going forward we will be looking for ways to transform the institution,” he said.
Though there have been many developments around campus during his tenure, there is room to grow, Tisdale said. He cited the most recent expansion, the Claflin Commons student housing, which is under construction and will open along Goff Avenue in the fall of 2014.
University officials and friends broke ground for the new residence hall in September 2013. Claflin Commons will house 200 students and feature a workout room, a large lobby (which will be called the Commons Area), and a new plaza.
Tisdale told students about other expansion plans, emphasizing improvements to Goff Avenue that will make it  safer for students, faculty and staff.
A major step in improving Goff is improving the parking, Tisdale said. He said the university is trying to remove parking along the street by working with Orangeburg City Council and property owners to achieve the objective. There are also plans to pave the gravel parking lots on Goff Avenue and obtain approval for adding speed humps to the street in order to slow traffic.
The changes are part of the university’s “Complete Streets” plan, which is about making the streets safer for pedestrians. Other improvements include more lighting along the streets, an escort program featuring fraternity members and other male students, and more security cameras around campus.
Acquiring more property for the university, upgrading the science and technology center, and upgrading the Jonas T. Kennedy Health and Physical Education Center are also on Tisdale’s agenda.
The upgrade for the Health and Physical Education Center will include adding a swimming pool, dance studios and even a second basketball court.
As to what Claflin University will be like in five years, Tisdale told students to look for great change.
“We’ll be looking for ways to transform the university … ways to take the university higher.”





'Evening of Stars'
recognizes
Justin Taylor

By CHANTERIA POLK
The Panther

One of Claflin's own, Justin Taylor, a sophomore with a double major in accounting and finance, was recognized on Sunday, April 13, for winning the Target Scholarship on UNCF "An Evening of Stars."
Taylor got the chance to attend the event hosted by Anthony Anderson and featuring Usher, Jill Scott and many more. In front of an audience of millions, he recognized his mom for always pushing him further and also his HBCU.
Congratulations Justin Taylor and please keep up the good work.

Dr. Leroy Durant discusses issues with multimedia students. (Panther photo)

Durant: Safety, security
Claflin's top priority

By PRINCESS WILLIAMS
The Panther

Claflin University is making a lot of changes for the next school year, with safety and security at the top of the list.
In a news conference with Mass Communications Department students, Vice President for Student Development and Services Dr. Leroy Durant said changes include more lighting, installation of security cameras and more phones around campus, plus fencing of the first parking lot on Goff Avenue, removal of the Millwood apartments and beginning an escort service.
"The No. 1 concern that will always be on any college campus is students, faculty and staff safety," Durant said.
The escort program will be available to males and females from 7 p.m. to midnight. Thirteen fraternity brothers will be trained and undergo security clearance. The gentlemen will not be armed. They will use walkie-talkies to communicate with security.
Durant addressed the precautions taken during the South Carolina State shooting incident in January.
"I think we did very well," he said. Buildings were locked, the siren had been sounded, Panther Alerts went out, and information about a potential suspect was distributed via email, which was provided by South Carolina State.
Durant said he was very concerned about seeing people walking around campus less than 20 minutes after the lockdown.
"We have some education to do. When sirens and alerts are used, people need to follow the rules."
A committee at Claflin is analyzing the "active shooter plan" to determine any need for change.
Students also have a part in assisting with security in all instances. "Officers cannot be everywhere all the time," Durant advised.
"Be aware of someone who is not a Claflin student," Durant said, indicating that students have a good idea when a person or a situation simply is not right. If someone is hanging around cars and is not recognizable, take note and notify security. Safety is in the hands of us all. Safety rests with all of us."
New residence halls will be ready by fall.
"The facility will house about 200 students and include the main entrance, high ceilings with natural lighting, open gathering spaces, a multipurpose room for student meetings and two fitness rooms," said Tijuana Hudson, vice president of business and finance.
"This is a building like no other we have on campus," Durant said. "When I look at this building, I'm just not looking at a residence hall. I'm looking at something that others across that country who want to build buildings for residential living will come and take a look at."
The purpose of the new housing for 100 males and 100 females is to get all "on-campus" students, numbering more than 1,100, back on campus.
Present Claflin housing locations, such as the former Russell Street Inn on Russell Street, will no longer be leased by Claflin.
"Everybody is not going to like change. Change is hard for people to swallow," Durant said.
Durant also referenced two other issues of interest to students: No return of freshman curfew and no tuition increase for the fall.

CALA-Bash 2014

Claflin students enjoy the electric slide during CALA-Bash. (Panther photo by T'Ara Berry)

Adande African Drum and Dance Company

Dance group brings African spirit to CALA-Bash

By ARIELLE HAYES
The Panther 

The African spirit was in the air as students ate lunch and enjoyed CALA-Bash week performances from the Adande African Drum and Dance Company.
The Adande Dance Company is a group of African drummers and dancers from North Charleston. The talented and energetic group of performers is led by Jesse L. Thrower.
The group kept the crowd entertained with dance moves and rhythmic beats. They performed a West African wedding/social dance and also taught the crowd about the different types of drums they use.
To end their performance, the group got the crowd involved by letting them play the drums and perform some of their dance moves with them.

Talent that
too often
goes unnoticed

By MIA ULMER
The Panther

Art can be found anywhere. Nevertheless, it is one of the most common subjects in school and life that goes unappreciated.
Too often, people undervalue art because they do not understand its complexity, the depth and genius required to create an empowering composition, or the time artists obligate on a project.
Events such as the Spoleto Festival USA, Buckhead Spring Arts & Crafts Festival and Claflin's Arts & Letters Annual Bash (CALA-Bash) provide artists a rare opportunity to highlight and expose their talent to a large body.
All year long, students from Claflin's Art Department work diligently creating and producing phenomenal work in preparation for the annual Student Art Exhibition held during CALA-Bash. Claflin's art professors also work long hours helping students develop ideas and attain inspiration. Their assistance, along with a little motivation from within, help students create the work seen in the CALA-Bash exhibition.
A couple of the artists featured in the exhibition this year were Jasmyne Wall and Leah Mitchell, two graduating Alice Carson Tisdale Honors College students. The works displayed ranged from mediums such as graphic pencils and paint to digital and mixed media.
Also included were a self-portrait completed by NaStajia Partee', an animated landscape piece by Dennis Bain and a digital photograph by Mia Ulmer.
The students' smooth transition of color, subtle changes and usage of contrast and value make apparent their knowledge of the elements and principles of art, as well as their advanced skills.
The talent of Claflin's students is made known to the community through events such as CALA-Bash. Exposing students' work to the public helps to advocate and create a stronger appreciation for the arts. If more people developed an interest in the arts, artists and the art world would be valued much more.
Individuals who are knowledgeable and skilled in the arts are needed visionaries that are essential to the growth of today's society and the production of a strong, future generation.

Mia Ulmer is a junior studio art major at Claflin University and an Orangeburg.

CALA-Bash and PULSE: A great combination

By JORDAN PAGE
The Panther

CALA-Bash is the Claflin Annual Letters and Arts Show or “bash.” PULSE is a Claflin creation. When the two meet, there is something worth experiencing.
CALA-Bash is a great opportunity to have fun, get to know more of your fellow Claflinites, meet new and also important people, network and all around enjoy what Claflin has to bring. During CALA-Bash week, there are all sorts of festivities and events.
One of the main shows in 2014 was the performance by PULSE, which is CU’s own dance company founded on campus by Claflin students.
The show was called “NOUVEAU!” which is the French word for new. It was full of new and exciting numbers that had you on the edge of your seat or clapping and cheering. There were 15 pieces (all choreographed by PULSE members) that all had a different theme, setting and feeling.
My favorite pieces were “Happy” and “Special Delivery.” Jas Frink and Merrell McDuffie choreographed “Happy” and performed to the song, “Because I’m Happy,” by Pharrell Williams. Michael Alston choreographed “Special Delivery” and performed it to the New York-based song “Special Delivery” by P. Diddy.
Being that I am a member of PULSE, I got to go backstage to get a more personal feel of the performance. Backstage was hectic and filled with people changing clothes, running from one side of the stage to another, working the curtain, re-applying make-up, etc. This just goes to show that PULSE really works hard and does everything it can to put on a great show.




Dillon Isaac is a junior from Blackville. He was elected 2014-15 SGA president. (Panther photo by Princess Williams)

Dillon Isaac ready
to go to work as Claflin’s
new SGA president

By PRINCESS WILLIAMS
The Panther 

And the winners are …
The results from the 2014 SGA election are in. All of the candidates campaigned extremely hard. Here are the winners:
SGA President – Dillon Isaac (Junior)
SGA Vice President – Keydareon Graham (Junior)
SGA Corresponding Secretary – Deysha Miller (Sophomore)
SGA Recording Secretary – Amaiah Henry (Sophomore)
SGA Chaplain – Dorian Dillard (Junior)
SGA Business Manager – Babatunde Sanusi (Sophomore)
Miss Claflin – Lia Holman (Junior)
Mr. Claflin – Ryan Black (Junior)
Miss Homecoming – Isha Conteh (Junior)
The new SGA president, Dillon Isaac, is a biology major minoring in chemistry from Blackville.
When interviewed about the campaigning process, he said, “As the election day came closer, it got more intense. It really encourages you to come out of your shell and increase your visibility on campus.”
When Dillon received the news of his victory, he was excited.
“I got the results at the beginning of a Leadership session, so I had to contain myself for about an hour after receiving the news. As soon as I was free, I called my parents, all of my supporters and responded to all the congratulatory messages.”
The candidate’s plans for the student body were stated in his platform.
“I really want to make Claflin a healthier campus in regards to nutrition and spiritually. I also noticed a deficit when it comes to communication between departments, so I’m extremely excited about bettering the communication between separate departments,” he said.
Isaac is no stranger to leadership. He was freshman class president during the semesters of 2011-12. He’s more than ready to get back to work for the student body.
“Overall, I think it’s a humbling experience to be recognized as a leader of this caliber by my peers. I look forward to putting the necessary work in to make it a memorable academic year.”

 Keeping up with
CAMPUS LIFE

Ashleigh Harriott, Princess Williams
and Chanteria D. Polk have their
eyes on the people and the activities
that are part of daily life
on the Claflin campus.
See what they're featuring
and follow them regularly
in this new feature of
The Panther.
If you wish to contribute information,
tell them personally or email
Ashleigh at aharriott@claflin.edu,
Princess at priwilliams@claflin.edu
and Chanteria at cpolk@claflin.edu.


Enjoy a little spring
with Claflin students

Claflin University senior JeLisa Ashby enjoys the much-anticipated spring weather. (Panther photo by Keenan Robinson)

Sophomore Kris Bennett says, “Minus the pollen and the constant rain, springtime is definitely my favorite time of year as well as the more exciting semester of the school year.” (Panther photo by CJ Riley)

Sophomore Drequan Thomas enjoys a springtime moment on the yard. (Panther photo by Shaketa Maiden-Harley)


Forget the cold, signs of spring are everywhere on campus. (Panther photo by Phillip Ellis)


“Spring is definitely my favorite season; for one, because I was born in spring in the month of May. And two, in spring it's not too cold and it's not too hot. I am definitely excited about spring. I am ready for this weather to start warming up and stay warm, because this cold weather one day and warm weather the next day is really annoying, and I don't know if I should dress warm or not.” -- Dannieka Cuttino (Photo of Dannieka Cuttino by Kyree Simon/The Panther)




Jackie Pleasant and Chari Zhane-Langley enjoy the second day of spring (March 21) at Claflin. (Panther photo by Ashley J. White)


Kacy Haynes says "Spring is such a beautiful time of year. People can express themselves and show how fabulous they really are." (Panther photo by Taylor Harris)

"Spring is definitely here! The flowers are blooming, along with nice cool breezes and it's warm enough to sit outside to star gaze. I was born in the spring month of March and it's also probate season. Shout out to my baby Ks," Chelsi Pinkett says. (Panther photo by T'Ara Berry)




Panthers in the News




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Panthers Caught 
on Camera

CALA-Bash Easter Egg Hunt for The Panther2

by Wendy Jeffcoat Crider | 16 Apr, 2014

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"Panthers Caught on Camera"
photos by
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INCLEMENT WEATHER NOTIFICATION DIRECTORY

​​
In the event of inclement weather conditions in the area, 
Claflin University may delay 
or cancel campus operations and classes. 
The above link contains
a directory of media outlets
that will alert you to any delayed opening,
early release
or closing information for Claflin University.